Contact Us

509-201-4190
Text Us
Rotted wood siding

Rotted Wood Siding: Causes and Solutions for Effective Repair

Welcome! If you’re noticing that your wood siding is starting to rot, don’t panic. Rotting wood siding is a common and fixable problem that many homeowners face. In this article, we’ll discuss the causes of rotted wood siding, as well as some solutions to help you effectively repair it and protect it from further damage. By the end of this article, you should have a better understanding of what steps to take in order to get your wood siding looking good as new again. 

Need a roofing contractor you can trust?

Call us (509)201-4190 or send the form

Disclaimer: This article is intended to be a general guide only and should not be considered as professional advice. Rotted wood siding can cause significant damage if not addressed promptly, and repairs are best left to experienced professionals. If you suspect that your home’s wood siding may be experiencing rot, we highly recommend seeking advice from Advance Roofing LLC. For over many years, the experienced team at Advance Roofing LLC has been providing the Spokane area with top quality roofing solutions and can assist in diagnosing and repairing any rotted wood siding on your home.

Definition of Rotted Wood Siding 

Rotted wood siding can be a serious issue for any homeowner. It occurs when water and excess moisture seep into the exterior wood surfaces of a home, weakening and decaying the wood fibers. The decay of wood fibers can result in structural damage to the siding and the entire piece of wood, affecting the overall stability of the building. 

Rotted wood siding can happen for a number of reasons. One common cause is water damage that comes from leaky exterior windows or window frames. Another common cause is damp wood that is adjacent to already rotting boards. Fungal growth is also likely to occur in moist, damp conditions, which can further exacerbate the problem. 

Signs of wood rot are likely to develop over time and may include soft or spongy wood, discoloration, and an unpleasant smell. Homeowners may also observe brown or black areas on the siding that can appear as a deep brown color, indicating deep-seated rot. If left untreated, the rot can spread and cause costly damages in the long run. 

Repairing rotten wood siding can be achieved through several means, but it’s essential to seek professional assistance for the job. One solution is to replace the rotted wood altogether or use a wood preservative to slow down the decaying process. Other techniques can include the use of a putty knife or utility knife to remove damaged wood and filling the area with fresh caulk. 

Adequate ventilation is critical to ensuring that the repair work is long-lasting. Quality siding and proper care can also help prevent the need for frequent repairs. Fiber cement siding or other durable siding options can provide a better alternative to wood. Ensuring that water sources are adequately maintained, such as gutters and downspouts, can also limit the source of moisture that causes rot. Regular maintenance practices such as painting with exterior paint can also help prevent fungal growth and water damage. 

In summary, rotted wood siding is a serious concern for homeowners, especially when it comes to those building materials that provide support and stability to the home. However, with proper care and regular maintenance, many of the negative consequences

can be avoided. When issues do arise, seeking professional help can help you identify and manage rotting wood effectively. 

Causes of Rotted Wood Siding 

Rotted wood siding is a problem that can plague any homeowner. Wood is a popular material for siding due to its aesthetic appeal and natural look, but it is also prone to rot. Understanding the causes of rotted wood siding can help you prevent the problem and maintain the beauty of your home. 

  1. One of the main causes of rotted wood siding is excessive moisture. Wood thrives in a moist environment, and if left unattended, it can become a breeding ground for fungi and bacteria that cause decay. Excessive moisture can come from a variety of sources, including leaky gutters, downspouts, and roofing systems, as well as excess water that accumulates around your foundation. Prolonged exposure to moisture can result in the breakdown of wood fibers, leading to rot. 
  2. Another cause of rotted wood siding is poor ventilation. Proper ventilation is essential to prevent moisture buildup, which can lead to wood rot. This is especially true in crawl spaces, decks, and other areas where wood is directly exposed to moisture without proper ventilation. If you notice an area of your home that is poorly ventilated, you should consider installing ventilation systems to prevent further damage to your wood siding. 
  3. Finally, wood siding can rot due to fungal growth. Fungi can grow and spread in moist conditions and feed on the natural nutrients found in wood. Without treatment, fungal growth can cause significant damage to your home’s structural integrity and aesthetics. 

In conclusion, understanding the causes of rotted wood siding is key to preventing and repairing the problem. Regular maintenance practices such as ensuring proper ventilation, monitoring sources of moisture, and treating fungal growth can help protect your siding and preserve the beauty of your home. By taking action and being proactive, you can maintain the value and functionality of your home for years to come. 

Signs and Symptoms of Wood Rot 

Wood rot can be a serious problem for any homeowner. It can cause structural damage to the home and even become a health hazard for those living inside. While prevention is the best method for combating wood rot, it’s important to know the signs and symptoms of wood rot to catch the problem early before it becomes too severe to fix. 

  1. One of the first signs of wood rot is a change in the look and feel of the wood. It may appear discolored or have a soft, spongy texture when touched. If the wood has become discolored and has taken on a brownish or blackish hue, it’s a sure sign that it’s rotting. 
  2. Another clue that your wood may be rotting is a strange musty smell. When wood is exposed to too much moisture, it can start to develop a foul odor that can permeate throughout the home. Keep your nose alert for any unpleasant smells that indicate rotting wood. 
  3. One of the most alarming signs of wood rot is when parts of the wood start to crumble away. If you start to see chunks of wood falling away, it’s a clear sign that the rot has reached an advanced stage, and the affected wood may need to be replaced.

When inspecting your wood siding for rot, pay attention to the areas around windows and doors. These areas are especially susceptible to moisture buildup, and may experience wood rot first. You can use a utility knife or a putty knife to gently probe the wood to see if it’s soft or seems to have lost its structural integrity. 

If you’re unsure whether your wood is rotting, it’s always best to consult a professional. They can assess the extent of the damage and provide guidance on whether the wood can be repaired or should be replaced. 

In conclusion, the signs and symptoms of wood rot include discoloration, a spongy texture, a musty smell, and crumbling wood. Regular maintenance and upkeep can prevent wood rot from becoming a severe problem, but it’s important to catch it early to avoid costly damages to your home. 

Structural Damage 

Structural damage is a serious issue that can cause significant harm to a building, and its occupants. If left unaddressed, structural damage can lead to costly repairs or even result in the collapse of the building. 

One common cause of structural damage is water damage. When water seeps into building materials such as wood, it can weaken the structural integrity of the building. Over time, the moisture can cause wood rot, which can lead to decay and eventual failure of the affected area. 

Another cause of structural damage is poor construction or design. If a building has been constructed with inadequate materials or with substandard workmanship, it can lead to issues with the structure of the building. Similarly, structural damage can occur if the design of the building is flawed, such as if load-bearing walls are not properly aligned. 

Signs of structural damage can include cracks in walls or ceilings, sagging floors or roofs, and doors or windows that do not close properly. If you notice any of these signs, it’s important to have a professional inspect your building to assess the extent of the damage and determine the best course of action. 

Depending on the severity of the damage, repairs may include reinforcing the affected area, replacing damaged materials, or even adding additional support structures to the building. In some cases, it may be necessary to completely demolish parts of the building and rebuild them from scratch. 

Preventing structural damage requires regular maintenance and upkeep. This includes identifying and fixing any water leaks, maintaining proper ventilation to prevent moisture buildup, and ensuring that all building materials are of high quality and properly installed. 

In summary, structural damage can be a serious issue that can lead to costly repairs or even the collapse of a building. If you suspect that your building may have structural damage, it’s important to have it inspected by a professional and take steps to prevent further damage. Regular maintenance and upkeep can help prevent structural damage from occurring in the first place. 

Fungal Growth

Fungal growth is a common problem that occurs in buildings and is caused by excessive moisture. Fungi are simple parasitic organisms that feed on organic matter such as wood and cellulose. When conditions are favorable, fungi can grow rapidly and form colonies that can cause significant damage to the affected areas. 

One of the primary causes of fungal growth is excess moisture. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including leaking pipes, roof leaks, poor ventilation, and high humidity levels. When moisture levels are too high, it creates the perfect environment for fungal growth, and the fungi can quickly spread to other areas of the building. 

There are several signs of fungal growth that building owners should be aware of. These include musty odors, discoloration or staining on walls or ceilings, and black, brown, or green patches of mold on surfaces. In more severe cases, there may be visible damage to the affected areas, such as rotting or decaying wood. 

To prevent fungal growth, it’s important to address any moisture issues as soon as possible. This may involve repairing leaks, improving ventilation, and using dehumidifiers in areas with high humidity levels. It’s also important to keep surfaces clean and dry to prevent the growth of mold and other fungi. 

If fungal growth is already present in a building, it’s important to address the problem quickly to prevent further damage. This may involve removing and replacing damaged materials, treating affected areas with antifungal agents, and improving ventilation to prevent future infestations. 

In conclusion, fungal growth can be a serious problem for buildings and can cause significant damage if left untreated. Building owners should be vigilant in identifying and addressing moisture issues to prevent the growth of fungi and should take immediate action if fungal growth is present. With proper maintenance and upkeep, buildings can remain fungi-free and in good condition for years to come. 

Water Damage 

Water damage is one of the most common and costly types of damage that can occur in a building. Whether it’s caused by a burst pipe, leaky roof, or flooding, water damage can lead to serious structural issues if not addressed quickly. 

One of the first things to do when dealing with water damage is to identify the source of the water and stop it from coming in. This may involve shutting off water valves, repairing leaks, or temporarily covering damaged areas with tarps or buckets. Once the water source has been dealt with, it’s important to remove any standing water and dry out the affected areas as soon as possible. 

If left untreated, water damage can lead to a variety of problems, including the growth of mold and mildew, which can be harmful to both the building and its occupants. It can also weaken the structural integrity of the building, leading to costly repairs down the line. 

In addition to addressing the immediate effects of water damage, it’s also important to take steps to prevent future damage. This may involve improving ventilation and insulation to prevent the buildup of moisture, installing sump pumps or drainage systems to prevent flooding, and regularly inspecting pipes and roofs for leaks.

In many cases, it’s best to hire a professional water damage restoration company to handle the cleanup and repairs. They have specialized equipment and expertise to quickly and effectively remove water, dry out affected areas, and prevent further damage. They can also work with insurance companies to help cover the cost of repairs. 

In conclusion, water damage is a serious issue that can have long-term effects on a building and its occupants. It’s important to take quick action to address the issue and prevent further damage from occurring. By identifying the source of the water, removing any standing water, drying out affected areas, and taking steps to prevent future damage, building owners can protect their investment and ensure the safety and health of those who use the building. 

Paint Degradation 

Paint degradation is a common problem that many homeowners experience over time. It occurs when the outermost layer of paint begins to break down, causing the surface to appear dull and discolored. This can be quite frustrating, especially if the paint job is relatively new. 

There are a number of causes of paint degradation. One of the most common is exposure to the elements. Over time, exposure to sunlight, rain, wind, and other weather conditions can cause the paint to fade, crack, and peel. This is particularly true for exterior paint jobs, which are constantly exposed to the elements. 

Another common cause of paint degradation is improper preparation. If the surface is not properly cleaned or primed before the paint is applied, the paint may not adhere properly, causing it to peel or crack. 

In addition to these causes, there are several other factors that can contribute to paint degradation. For example, using low-quality paint or applying too few coats of paint can result in a weaker and more easily damaged coating. Similarly, using harsh cleaning agents or abrasive materials to clean painted surfaces can cause the paint to degrade more quickly. 

Fortunately, there are a number of steps you can take to prevent or repair paint degradation. One of the most important is to choose a high-quality paint that is designed to withstand the conditions it will be exposed to. It’s also important to properly prepare the surface before painting by cleaning it thoroughly and using a good primer. 

Regular maintenance is also essential. This includes regularly cleaning the painted surface with a gentle soap and water solution to remove dirt and debris, and inspecting the surface for signs of damage. If you do notice signs of paint degradation, it’s important to address them promptly. This may involve repainting the affected area or using a specialized product designed to repair damaged paint. 

In conclusion, paint degradation is a common problem that can be caused by a variety of factors. However, by taking the right precautions and maintaining your painted surfaces properly, you can help ensure that they remain looking great for years to come. 

Window Sills and Other Areas Prone to Damage 

When it comes to wood rot, few areas are as vulnerable as your window sills. These horizontal surfaces are constantly exposed to moisture from rain, condensation, and

watering plants on the windowsill. If water is allowed to seep into the wood, it can cause rot to develop. Other areas that are prone to rot include exterior wood siding, wooden beams, and framing. 

One of the first signs of wood rot is discoloration. The wood may take on a brown or deep brown color, which indicates that fungal growth has already taken root. With time, the wood will become spongy and lose its structural integrity, leading to costly damages if left unaddressed. 

If you notice signs of wood rot, it’s important to address the problem immediately. In some cases, you may need to replace the entire piece of wood or siding. However, if the damage is caught early, it may be possible to repair the rotted area rather than replace the entire board. 

To repair damaged wood, begin by removing any loose or rotted material with a utility knife or putty knife. Be sure to remove all compromised wood fibers until you reach healthy, solid wood. Once the damaged area has been removed, apply a wood preservative to the exposed wood to prevent further decay. 

After the wood preservative has dried, apply a wood filler to fill in any gaps or holes. Once the filler has dried, you can sand the affected area smooth. Finally, apply a coat of fresh paint or stain to protect the repair and ensure that it blends in with the surrounding wood. 

To prevent wood rot and other forms of damage, it’s important to practice regular maintenance of your siding and window sills. This includes inspecting these areas for signs of damage, cleaning them regularly, and applying fresh caulk to seal gaps and prevent leaks. With proper care, you can avoid costly repairs and keep your home looking its best for years to come. 

Types of Wood Rot 

Wood rot is a common problem that affects many homeowners. If left untreated, it can spread quickly and compromise the integrity of your home’s structure. In order to effectively treat wood rot, it’s important to understand the different types of rot and how they affect wood. 

  1. The first type of wood rot is called brown rot. As the name suggests, brown rot causes wood to turn a deep brown color as it dries up and cracks. Brown rot occurs when the wood is exposed to excessive moisture for a prolonged period of time. This type of rot is particularly hard to detect, as it often goes unnoticed until it has already done significant damage. 
  2. The next type of wood rot is white rot. Unlike brown rot, which typically affects softwoods like pine and fir, white rot attacks hardwoods like oak and maple. This type of rot causes the wood to become soft and spongy, and it often appears as a white or light-colored cellulose. White rot is typically found in damp wood, and can spread quickly if not treated promptly. 
  3. Finally, there’s dry rot. This is perhaps the most destructive type of wood rot, as it can spread quickly and significantly weaken the wood’s structure. Dry rot occurs when the wood is exposed to a constant source of moisture, such as in crawl spaces or near leaky pipes. This type of rot typically appears as a deep brown color, and it causes the wood to become dry, brittle, and crack.

If you suspect that your home may have wood rot, it’s important to take action immediately. Ignoring the problem can lead to costly damages and compromise the safety of your home. Be sure to inspect your home regularly for signs of wood rot, and call a professional if you notice any unusual discoloration or softness in the wood. By understanding the different types of wood rot and their causes, you can take steps to protect your home and keep it safe for years to come. 

Wet Rot 

Wet rot is a common problem that affects wooden structures, including siding, windowsills, and wooden beams. It occurs when wood is exposed to a constant source of moisture, such as leaking pipes, rainwater, or high humidity levels. Wet rot can significantly weaken the wood’s structure and compromise the safety of a building. In this article, we will explore the causes and solutions for wet rot, as well as the signs to look out for. 

Causes of Wet Rot 

The primary cause of wet rot is excessive moisture exposure. When wood is constantly damp, it creates a prime habitat for fungi to grow. This fungal growth feeds on the wood fibers, breaking down its structure and causing it to weaken and deteriorate. Wet rot is more common in areas where wood is in regular contact with moisture, such as window frames, exterior siding, and wooden features within the interior of the home. 

Signs of Wet Rot 

One of the most common signs of wet rot is the wood becoming discolored and taking on a darker appearance. The wood may also feel spongy or soft to the touch. In severe cases, the wood may crumble or break apart when touched or pressed. You may also notice fungal growth on the affected wood, like a black or white coating. Wet rot can cause structural damage to the wooden beams and framing, leading to costly repairs if left unaddressed. 

Solutions for Wet Rot 

The first step to treating wet rot is to identify and eliminate the source of moisture that is causing the problem. This can include fixing leaking pipes, repairing damaged siding or roofs, and improving ventilation and airflow to reduce humidity levels. Once the source of moisture is under control, the affected wood may need to be removed and replaced. If only a portion of the wood is affected, it may be possible to cut out the rotten area and attach a replacement board. 

To prevent wet rot from occurring in the future, it’s essential to properly maintain the wood surfaces in and around your home. This can include regular maintenance of siding, exterior paint, and caulking around windows and doors. Wood preservatives can also be applied to help protect the wood from fungal growth and water damage. 

Dry Rot 

Dry rot is a type of wood decay that can cause significant damage to wooden structures. Unlike wet rot, which thrives in damp environments, dry rot can occur in dry conditions. It is caused by a fungus that feeds on the cellulose and other components of wood, weakening its structure and causing it to crumble. 

One of the common causes of dry rot is insufficient ventilation. When wood does not have enough air circulation, it can become damp and create an ideal environment for the growth of dry rot fungus. Another common cause of dry rot is water damage, which can occur from leaks or condensation in a building. 

One of the challenges of dry rot is that it can be difficult to detect until it has caused significant damage. Unlike wet rot, which typically creates visible signs of decay, dry rot can remain hidden for some time. However, there are some common signs that can indicate the presence of dry rot, including cracking, shrinking, and crumbling of the wood. In severe cases, the wood may become so weak that it breaks apart. 

The key to managing dry rot is to identify and address the underlying cause of the problem. This may involve improving ventilation, repairing leaks, or addressing other sources of water damage. Once the cause has been addressed, it may be necessary to remove and replace affected sections of wood. In some cases, it may also be necessary to treat the wood with chemicals to prevent further fungal growth. 

To prevent dry rot from occurring, it is important to take steps to maintain the integrity of wooden structures. This may include regular inspections and maintenance, as well as treatment with wood preservatives to help prevent fungal growth. Proper ventilation is also essential to ensure that wood does not become damp and create an environment for dry rot to thrive. 

In summary, dry rot is a serious problem that can cause significant damage to wooden structures. It is important to be aware of the common causes and signs of this condition and to take steps to prevent it from occurring. By maintaining proper ventilation and addressing water damage promptly, it is possible to avoid the costly and time-consuming process of repairing dry rot damage. 

White Rot 

White rot is a type of wood decay caused by certain species of fungi that can break down both cellulose and lignin, the two primary components of wood. Unlike other types of wood rot, which typically only break down cellulose, white rot can cause extensive damage to the structure of wood over time. 

One of the distinguishing characteristics of white rot is its appearance. As the fungi break down lignin, the wood can take on a distinctive pale or bleached appearance. The texture of the wood may also become spongy or stringy, making it weaker and more prone to breaking apart. 

White rot can occur in a variety of environments, including damp or poorly ventilated spaces. Moisture is a key factor in the development of white rot, as it provides the

necessary conditions for fungal growth. For this reason, it is important to address any sources of excess moisture in buildings, such as leaks or high humidity levels. 

One of the challenges of dealing with white rot is that it can be difficult to detect until significant damage has been done. However, there are some signs that can indicate the presence of white rot, including discoloration, softening, and cracking of the wood. In severe cases, the wood may become so damaged that it cannot support weight or function properly. 

To treat white rot, it is necessary to remove and replace any affected sections of wood. This may involve removing surrounding wood to ensure that all of the fungi have been eliminated. In some cases, it may also be necessary to use fungicides or other chemical treatments to prevent further fungal growth. 

Preventing white rot starts with proper maintenance and care of wooden structures. This may include regular inspections and maintenance, as well as treatment with wood preservatives to help prevent fungal growth. Proper ventilation is also essential to ensure that wood does not become damp and create an environment for white rot to thrive. 

In summary, white rot is a serious type of wood decay that can cause extensive damage if left untreated. Identifying and addressing the underlying cause of fungi growth is crucial to preventing and managing white rot in buildings and structures. 

Prevention and Maintenance Tips for Rotted Wood Siding

Prevention and Maintenance Tips for Rotted Wood Siding

Rotted wood siding can be a real problem for homeowners, significantly affecting the appearance and structural integrity of their property. To avoid costly damages and repairs it is important to take proper care of wooden structures and siding. Here are some prevention and maintenance tips to help you avoid rotted wood siding: 

  1. Regular Inspections: The first step in preventing rotted wood siding is to conduct regular inspections of your home’s exterior. Look for any signs of damage, such as soft areas, discoloration, or cracks, and take action promptly when you find them. 
  2. Maintain Exterior Paint: Paint protects the wood from moisture and other environmental elements. It is important to maintain coats of exterior paint regularly, reapplying it every 5- 7 years, as it prevents water damage and keeps the wood dry. 
  3. Proper Ventilation: Ventilation is crucial in preventing rotted wood siding. Properly vented roofs or crawl spaces can ensure that humidity levels remain low, limiting the moisture that rots wood siding. 
  4. Caulk & Seal Gaps: Caulk and seal the gaps between wood siding and window frames or exterior pipes. These gaps can allow water to penetrate the siding if not addressed and contribute to wood rot, mold, and mildew growth. 
  5. Trim Nearby Vegetation: Overhanging trees and shrubs create shade and absorb moisture, causing damp wood siding. Maintain any nearby vegetation, trim overhanging branches, and remove plants that grow too closely to the siding. 
  6. Regular Maintenance: Performing regular maintenance keeps the wooden siding in good condition, ensuring rot does not develop. Clean siding with light-colored cellulose sponges, and a mild cleaner to prevent any fungi growth on the surfaces.
  7. Replace Any Rotten Boards: Removing any damaged or rotted boards may prevent further damages and allow for a complete replacement. It ensures that the current damages do not cause more severe issues later and extends the lifespan of the remaining siding. 

Implementing these prevention and maintenance tips can go a long way towards ensuring the longevity of your wooden siding and preventing its rotting. With proper care and attention, homeowners can avoid costly damages and keep their homes in great condition! 

Regular Inspections & Repairs 

Wood siding is a beautiful and timeless choice for home exteriors. However, it is also vulnerable to rot, which can cause costly damages and compromise the structural integrity of your home. Rot progresses quickly and can spread to neighboring structures, making it important to address it early on to prevent extensive damage. 

Regular inspections of your home’s exterior are crucial in preventing rotted wood siding. It is recommended that you inspect your siding at least twice a year, during the spring and fall, to identify any signs of damage. Soft areas, discoloration, and cracks are signs that your wood siding may be rotting. These signs should be taken seriously and addressed promptly to prevent further damage. 

If you spot any areas of damage, it is important to take immediate action. One solution is to replace any rotted boards, as this prevents further damage from occurring and extends the lifespan of your siding. To replace a rotted board, use a utility knife or a putty knife to remove the damaged board, making sure you do not damage adjacent boards. Then, use a new replacement board that fits snugly into the opening. 

In addition to regular inspections, proper maintenance is also essential in preventing rotted wood siding. This includes maintaining the exterior paint, which protects the wood from moisture and other environmental elements. Exterior paint should be maintained regularly, reapplying every 5-7 years, to prevent water damage and keep the wood dry. 

Proper ventilation is also crucial in preventing rotted wood siding. Properly vented roofs or crawl spaces can ensure that humidity levels remain low, limiting the moisture that rots wood siding. Caulking and sealing gaps between wood siding and window frames or exterior pipes is also recommended. These gaps can allow water to penetrate the siding if not addressed and contribute to wood rot, mold, and mildew growth. 

In conclusion, regular inspections and repairs are crucial in preventing rotted wood siding. By identifying any signs of damage early on and taking prompt action, you can prevent extensive damage and ensure the long-term health of your home’s exterior. Proper maintenance, including maintaining exterior paint and having proper ventilation, can also reduce the risk of wood rot and keep your siding in excellent condition for years to come.

Wood siding covered with mildew

Conclusion 

Regular inspections and proper maintenance are key in preventing rotted wood siding, as well as replacing any damaged boards as soon as possible. Maintaining exterior paint, proper ventilation, and sealing gaps can all contribute to preventing water damage and wood rot.

It is important to address rotted wood siding early on to prevent it from spreading and causing further damage. Failure to address the problem can lead to more extensive repairs and costly renovations. By taking the necessary preventative measures and promptly addressing any signs of wood rot, you can ensure that your home’s wood siding remains beautiful and structurally sound for years to come. 

If you suspect that your home’s wood siding may be experiencing rot, it is important to seek professional advice and assistance. A qualified contractor can provide guidance on the best course of action to prevent further damage and restore your wood siding to its former beauty. With proper care and attention, your wood siding can remain a stunning feature of your home for many years to come. 

Frequently Asked Questions about Rotted Wood Siding

What are the signs of wood rot?

Signs of wood rot may include warped or soft boards, darkening of the wood, and cracking or flaking of paint.

How can I prevent structural damage from rotted wood siding?

To prevent structural damage, regular inspections and repairs should be done to identify any issues early on. Maintaining exterior paint, proper ventilation and sealing gaps between the siding and window frames can also help reduce the risk of water damage.

How often should I reapply exterior paint?

Exterior paint should be maintained regularly, reapplying every 5-7 years to protect the wood from moisture and other environmental elements.

How do I replace a rotted board?

To replace a rotted board, first use a utility knife or putty knife to remove the damaged board without damaging adjacent boards. Then, use a new replacement board that fits snugly into the opening.